Dennis C. Stephens, RMT, NMT, CST, LDT, VMT
Advanced Therapy Center

800 Bering, Ste 227
Houston TX 77057
713-789-0080

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Leg, Knee and Foot Therapy 

 

Leg Therapy 

Minor leg problems, such as sore muscles, are common. Leg problems commonly occur during sports or recreational activities, work-related tasks, and work or projects around the home. Leg problems also can be caused by injuries.

Leg problems may be minor or serious and may include symptoms such as pain, swelling, cramps, numbness, tingling, weakness, or changes in temperature or color. Symptoms often develop from exercise, everyday wear and tear, or overuse.

Older adults have a higher risk for leg problems because they lose muscle mass as they age. Children may have leg problems for the same reasons as adults or for reasons specific to children. Problems are often caused by overactivity or the rapid growth of bone and muscle that occurs in children.Topic Overview

Minor leg problems, such as sore muscles, are common. Leg problems commonly occur during sports or recreational activities, work-related tasks, and work or projects around the home. Leg problems also can be caused by injuries.

Leg problems may be minor or serious and may include symptoms such as pain, swelling, cramps, numbness, tingling, weakness, or changes in temperature or color. Symptoms often develop from exercise, everyday wear and tear, or overuse.

Older adults have a higher risk for leg problems because they lose muscle mass as they age. Children may have leg problems for the same reasons as adults or for reasons specific to children. Problems are often caused by overactivity or the rapid growth of bone and muscle that occurs in children.

Knee Therapy 

What Are the Major Structures of the Knee? What Do They Do?

The knee joint works like a hinge to bend and straighten the lower leg. It permits a person to sit, stand, and pivot.

Bones and Cartilage

The knee joint is the junction of three bones -- the femur (thigh bone or upper leg bone), the tibia (shin bone or larger bone of the lower leg), and the patella (kneecap). The patella is about 2 to 3 inches wide and 3 to 4 inches long. It sits over the other bones at the front of the knee joint and slides when the leg moves. It protects the knee and gives leverage to muscles.

The ends of the three bones in the knee joint are covered with articular cartilage, a tough, elastic material that helps absorb shock and allows the knee joint to move smoothly. Separating the bones of the knee are pads of connective tissue called menisci, which are divided into two crescent-shaped discs positioned between the tibia and femur on the outer and inner sides of each knee. The two menisci in each knee act as shock absorbers, cushioning the lower part of the leg from the weight of the rest of the body, as well as enhancing stability.

Muscles

There are two groups od muscles at the knee.  The quadriceps muscle comprises four muscles on the front of the thigh that work to straighten the leg from a bent position.  The hamstring muscles, which bend the leg at the knee, run along the back of the thigh from the hip to just below the knee.

Ligaments

Ligaments are strong, elastic bands of tissue that connect bone to bone. They provide strength and stability to the joint. Four ligaments connect the femur and tibia:

  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL) provides stability to the inner (medial) aspect of the knee.
  • The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) provides stability to the outer (lateral) aspect of the knee.
  • The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), in the center of the knee, limits rotation and the forward movement of the tibia.
  • The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), also in the center of the knee, limits backward movement of the tibia.

Other ligaments are part of the knee capsule, which is a protective, fiber-like structure that wraps around the knee joint. Inside the capsule, the joint is lined with a thin, soft tissue, called synovium.

Tendons

Tendons are tough cords of tissue that connect muscle to bone. In the knee, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps muscle to the patella and provides power to extend the leg. The patellar tendon connects the patella to the tibia. Technically, it is a ligament, but it is commonly called a tendon.

Foot Therapy

Everyone has had a minor problem with a toe, foot, or ankle. Most of the time our body movements do not cause problems, but it's not surprising that symptoms develop from everyday wear and tear or overuse. Toe, foot, or ankle problems can also occur from injuries or the natural process of aging.

Your toes, feet, or ankles may burn, sting, hurt, feel tired, sore, stiff, numb, tingly, hot, or cold. You may have had a “charley horse” (muscle cramp) in your foot while lying in bed at night. Your feet or ankles may change color or swell. You may have noticed an embarrassing odor from your feet. Some changes in your feet and ancles are normalas a person ages orduring pregnancy. Home treatment is usually all that is needed to relieve your symptoms.

Toe, foot, or ankle problems may be caused by an injury. However, there are many noninjury causes of toe, foot, or ankle problems.

Plantar Faciitis – Heel Pain

Has this happened to you? Your first few steps out of bed in the morning causes severe pain in your heel? Or does your heel hurt after jogging or playing tennis?

Most commonly, heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis , an inflammation of the fibrous tissue (plantar fascia) along the bottom of your foot that connects your heel bone (calcaneus) to your toes.

The plantar fascia acts like a shock-absorbing bowstring, supporting the arch in your foot. However, if tension on that bowstring becomes too great, minute tears can occur along with inflammation. The result is a stabbing or burning pain that's usually worse in the morning because the fascia tightens (contracts) overnight. Once your foot limbers up, the pain generally decreases, but it may return after long periods of standing or after getting up from a seated position. In severe instances, your foot may hurt with the slightest pressure, making walking difficult. Sometimes, plantar fasciitis or heel pain is also associated with a growth (bone spur) that develops from tension on your heel bone.

Plantar fasciitis generally gets better with the help of simple treatments for the pain and inflammation. It may take a year or more for the condition to clear completely, but about 90 percent of people with plantar fasciitis improve after two months of initial treatment.

Results and Expectations from the Advanced Massage Therapy Center:
Most all leg and foot pains are commonly referral from muscles. Toe and ball of foot are cause mostly from improper foot placement and joint dysfunction. Initial therapy will relieve most acute pain. Additional therapies are recommended for more chronic situations.

Recommended Therapy: NeuroMuscular & Lyphatic Drainage Massage.